Stay At Home! Literary Festival

I have been absent because of the current crisis, but I’m here to tell you about the wonderful #StayAtHome!LiteraryFestival, organised at lightening speed by the brilliant Carolyn Jess-Cooke in partnership with Paper Nations. A flood of writers and artists responded to Carolyn’s initial Tweet about the idea on Twitter and within a few days the …

Liz Ferrets Poetry Competition

There are only three days left to enter the Liz Ferrets Poetry Competition judged by me, Sez Thomasin and Kate Garrett. Liz was a brilliant poet and performer from Sheffield and the competition celebrates her life and writing. The winners will be announced at The Showroom (Sheffield) on Monday 17 January. The competition is free …

Review: Girl by Rebecca Goss

This is the proof of my review of Rebecca Goss‘s Girl (Carcanet, 2019), published in the most recent issue of Stand Magazine (17.3), guest edited by Vahni Capildeo. Rebecca Goss’s Girl sparks with light, electricity, bodies. This collection of spare, precise poems, characterised by Goss’s distinctive control of her material, not only explores what it is to …

Listening Workshop!

I’ve been working on the Collections in Verse project for Sheffield – a collaborative commission with Poet in the City and The British Library. As part of this project, I’m running a series of workshops to listen to the tales and experiences that are important to women in Sheffield. The workshops will ask women what …

Poetry in Translation

It has been a pleasure working with Yin Xiaoyuan at the Encyclopedic Poetry School in China, who are celebrating their 12th anniversary this year. Xiaoyuan has translated a number of my poems into Chinese, and continues to work tirelessly to translate poems from all over the world. The Encyclopedic Poetry School is an independent, experimental …

Review: Poetry, Print and Postcolonial Literature

This is the proof of my review of Poetry, Print, and the Making of Postcolonial Literature by Nathan Suhr-Sytsma (CUP, 2017), recently published by the Journal of Postcolonial Writing. This ambitious book opens with an anecdote about the accomplished Nigerian poet, Christopher Okigbo. In 1965, Okigbo published a poem in a volume of essays to mark …